EggCollection

Before I start, I feel the need to announce – as a bit of a disclaimer – that I am a real big wimp. Aside from a bit of light self harm (don’t ask) I generally do everything I can to avoid pain or situations where I might end up in hospital/on a drip/cannula/needing surgery… whilst at the same time being a bit of a “I’ll try anything once” daredevil… I guess I enter into things cautiously.. cautious Karen.. my mum has always found it hilarious that I want four children, because I am the biggest wimp when it comes to pain, she thinks I’ll stop at one!!

But, I have to say, throughout our entire fertility journey, pain has really been limited – or really, really manageable. I know of course that everyone is different, but from the worlds biggest wimp to anyone else reading this in fear of pain… it’s ok.

I was super anxious for egg collection. I think it is really why we bothered with IUI before IVF. But mostly I was anxious for the general anaesthetic that comes with egg collection, purely because I’d never had one. Rationally I knew I’d be fine – my mum, dad and brother have all had GA and been fine. But I was terrified I wouldn’t wake up (not that I’d know!) or that I’d be one of those horror stories where you’re seemingly knocked out but you can see (?) and hear and feel everything. I was also anxious that despite plenty of eggs being there, that none would be collected. It was literally the first thing I said when I came round and I was in tears asking because I was scared the answer would be a devastating none. I believe this happens in LESS THAN 1% of cases… so it was pretty unlikely but I became absolutely beyond convinced it would happen to us. Initially I was just sure the IVF just wouldn’t work, but that we’d collect plenty of eggs to keep trying.. then my delightful (anxiety?) brain decided egg collection would fail too… I’m pleased to report, it didn’t πŸ™ƒ we were lucky enough to have 15 eggs retrieved.. although I can’t help but keep wondering where the other 10+ I had have disappeared to!

Coming round after surgery!

I’ll add a laugh.. on the evening after our egg collection, I had to stay at a friends for a bit whilst James closed up at work. [All fine, you just aren’t allowed to be alone for 24 hours after GA.] Along with her 2.5 year old son, we sat down to watch “Sing”… there wasn’t really much watching going on because, as much as I love him to pieces, that kid is NON-STOP! Anyway, we did happen to glance up at one point and see this image on the screen – and we were in hysterics because it looks like James and I with our 15 eggs πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ if you look closely, there IS actually 15 piglets in this image 🀣🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷🐷

Back to the egg collection – like I said, it was fine, but here is some more detail.. I was anxious (standard πŸ™„) about traffic in Bristol, particularly as snow was forecast, so we left early and of course arrived ridiculously early. We were at the hospital for 8.20am, James’ participation was due at 9am… πŸ™„ – I’d always rather be earlier than late though ☺️. After James had completed his arduous task (πŸ™„πŸ™„πŸ€£) we continued to just wait around at the hospital for my 10am admission. I was nil by mouth from midnight the night before (I’d had an oatcake at about 10pm to “help me sleep” (total fail; I eventually got 3 hours, then woke suddenly just after 2am & couldn’t get back to sleep 😒) and keep my blood sugar even… it is also recommended that you avoid strong smells on the morning of egg collection as they can harm developing embryo’s. So a coffee for James was off the menu too!

We were taken through to theatre on the dot at 10am and settled in nicely.. what we didn’t realise and hadn’t ever had mentioned is that we were looking at another 2 hour wait from there.. I had thought I was going into theatre for 10.15am, so although we were well looked after (the staff at BCRM are all really, really lovely; we adore them) it kind of just added to my anxiety about the upcoming cannula and sedation.. I don’t know if that is normal or if there was some sort of problem/delay. Either way, the time was passed with me snuggled up in the big comfy chair, flipping through a magazine, chatting to James and meeting our anaesthetist/surgeon/theatre staff etc (frustratingly I can’t actually remember everyone’s names.. sorry 😬)… James as is standard even managed to fall asleep briefly despite being sat bolt upright on a hard wooden chair…!!! I started to get hungry (ironic given I’d spent the two weeks prior on meds finding myself never hungry!) but the time did pass fairly quickly and before we knew it it was time to strip off and put the gown of fashion dreams on!! The only other thing I would add – and I don’t know if this is just an NHS thing or if it’s the same privately, but we didn’t ever see my “named nurse”, or even any of the nurses we have previously seen, know and love – other than a brief passing of one of our favourite’s (I have 4) getting a coffee whilst we waited in reception! So everyone that morning was new to us. Like I said – everyone is so super lovely that it’s fine… and maybe (definitely!) it’s just me needing some extra reassurance and love from those that I know πŸ™ƒπŸ˜‚

As always, all the staff were lovely, and when we had seen the anaesthetist she had mentioned I looked terrified – so I told her I hated drips/cannula’s (after an awful experience as an ill 14/15 year old with collapsed veins on a drip in a foreign hospital!) and was scared of general anaesthetic.. in general!! So when it came to that, it felt to me like a lot of effort was going into keeping me engaged in conversation whilst they put that in my hand in theatre. Of course I still knew what was going on and could feel it, but conversation was a great distraction! When they popped the sedation meds in, they mentioned I might be able to feel a discomfort as it ran down my arm – and they weren’t wrong! It was a really horrible, odd, uncomfortable feeling. I think I would describe it as slightly painful, but once again all the theatre staff were great at trying to distract. It helped that I had my fab Santa Christmas nails (Thanks Claire!) which everyone loves and my body was sparkly all over from the glitter bath bomb the night before as that engaged lots of chatter! I remember speaking to someone about making their own glittery bath bombs and then ping! Asleep! I don’t remember the last thing anyone said – but I do remember a mask being placed over my mouth and nose and being told to take deep breaths.. I think I managed maybe 3 before my memories stop for sleep..!

I came round from surgery with a bit of a start. I think I came round earlier than expected as there was a nurse stood next to me when I came round who also seemed surprised I was awake – what a shocker, the insomniac still doesn’t sleep properly even with serious sedation!! – I remember saying hello to her (& her back!) and then just wanting to cry. She disappeared (I think to notify James I was awake so he could come through) and when she returned I was sobbing (I must be the only person not to be giggly coming round from sedation πŸ™ƒ – and believe me I am GUTTED – I wanted to feel that kind of tipsy-drink, girlie, giggly happiness!!) I managed to choke out asking how many eggs they had collected, to which she went off to check. I wonder now if I was so anxious that the number would be zero that it caused the tears. I was still a bit tearful when James appeared, but it soon ended, and I just felt exhausted and annoyed I’d woken up so quickly!! Frankly I would have welcomed more sedation meds at that point!

I think I took the maximum amount of time they expect to recover and be discharged. A lady in the bay next to me came out after me (I was awake so saw her being wheeled out!) and was up and about and had left before I even had my cannula out! I wondered if she had done that part before as she seemed aware that she had to pee before they’d remove the cannula, and did so quickly! Whereas I asked for it to be removed and was told I needed to pee first – to which I started inhaling as much water as I could to get the hideous thing out of my hand!! It seemed to take forever before I felt the need to pee – and even when I thought I was ready I felt like I was sat on the toilet for ages waiting!

This made me laugh - I’m rubbish at decisions anyway!
Side effects – I struggle to make decisions at the best of times as it is!

I felt bloated, tender and uncomfortable after and like I needed to “pass wind” but nothing was happening! You could clearly see bloating from my pubic bone to my belly button. I hadn’t initially noticed any pain when I was in the hospital until I shifted my legs slightly as James arrived and then it hit me. I was given some paracetamol which didn’t even touch the sides, before having some codeine which sorted everything. I wouldn’t say the pain was horrendous though, much like strong period pain. I took some more of my over-the-counter paracetamol & codeine tablets later at home but they didn’t help – the best thing for me was warmth, and fortunately, my friends who were watching me have two “doodles” – and the warmth from them snuggling into me was nice (two doodle heads resting on my ovaries was lovely!)

Doodle hot water bottles!!
Doodle-warmers!

I also felt nauseous and the longer I stood up for the more sick, shakey and faint I felt. But the worst for me (and I am NOT a big poop talker…) was being constipated… A friend who has a fair few general anaesthetics under her belt now tells me that is a side effect and that it can take ages to sort itself out. Believe me, it did. Constipation is also on the list of side effects for basically everything I was taking as well so I basically got what felt like 75 thousand doses of the joy in one go. I gave in by day 4 of it and took laxatives – knowing that after transfer that wouldn’t be an option, and I am bloody glad I did – that gave me some mild relief before transfer and it all kicked off again. I am finishing writing this blog approximately 9 weeks after our egg collection and I am STILL not quite right now. It is THE WORST, so, my top tip there would be take the laxatives, take ALL the laxatives, every bloody day until transfer. (OK, maybe not all…but make yourself more comfortable!) Clear yourself out! I am not sure if it was all from the op, the sedation, the lack of sleep the night before, or the OHSS!

Now I’m aware I haven’t mentioned OHSS before… Ovarian Hyper Stimulation Syndrome. I’ll try to explain what I think is right as the “expert patient”! OHSS is a risk for those that have high AMH/egg count/reserves/PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome). It’s never fully been confirmed or denied, so as we understand it, I am borderline PCOS. High AMH means I have plenty of eggs – which is good – but as we know, they just don’t seem to want to do much [ovulating] on their own. So, with the medication that goes with IVF to stimulate your ovaries to create the follicles (sacs which carry the eggs), someone with a high egg count is likely to over-stimulate. It’s quite hard for anyone to predict or control what is going to happen. My initial dose for stimming (menopur) was quite low – so low in fact that for a week, nothing happened. My dose was increased for 5 days and then everything kicked off – and by the time I had my last scan before egg collection, my nurse had to sit me down and explain that I was at high risk of developing OHSS. I had 25+ eggs and if they collect anything over 20 BCRM (although I think all clinic’s are the same; if they maintain some level of responsibility anyway!) won’t do a fresh embryo transfer within the week because of the OHSS risk and dangers. Frustrating to hear, but I do think it shows their responsibility and care as a clinic rather than just powering on through. As we know, 15 eggs were collected from me which was good news in terms of OHSS, and hopefully being able to go ahead with a fresh transfer within the week, but still meant I was at risk from it, so I was given meds (in tablet form, called Cabergoline) to take every night before bed for the next 8 days to reduce the risk. Cabergoline comes with its own set of side effects (some of which I found hilarious, “β€œUncontrollable excessive shopping or spending”, {like I need an excuse!!} and “excessive day sleeping” which I certainly seemed to do, particularly on the Sunday!) and I definitely felt like I was suffering from certain side effects (bloating (which reduced massively by Monday, op was Friday), exhaustion, slight pain particularly in right side/ovary* (not sure if that one had produced more, which would make sense), constant hunger, constipation, flashes of light across my eyelids when eyes closed/trying to sleep (almost like the outdoor lights were turning on and waking me up, except of course, they weren’t!) and at times seemingly low blood pressure and felt like I was blacking out whilst trying to sleep (so I sat myself more upright in bed for fear of swallowing own tongue!!?! YES mental anxiety brain!)), but it is hard to place which symptom matched which issue, be it from the surgery, OHSS itself, lack of sleep (I’d had only 3 hours sleep the night before surgery, and about the same the night of it; I was EXHAUSTED by Saturday night!!), or the Cabergoline!

Ironically, the Cabergoline can make you drowsy… but yup, you guessed it; not me on the first night at least – just when I needed it!!

Happily making myself at home at a friends πŸ™‚

We realised, in discussion with our friends that evening as we headed home, that, as long as one of our little eggies sticks when they (hopefully) transferred it into me the next week, that I was technically pregnant right there and then! So weird/funny to think that our little eggs were fertilising and thus I could technically be pregnant right now even though our embabies/blastobabies were 32 miles away in a Petrie dish!!

Received from husband the Monday after egg collection – I like to think it is!

After egg collection you are generally (providing there isn’t a male infertility factor) recommended to use condoms when having sex in between collection and transfer – I believe this is just in case any eggs are left behind and then get fertilised and then them transferring you another 1 (or in some cases 2!) and ending up again with multiple births..

LET ME TELL YOU – don’t bother with the condoms. Seriously; AS IF. I am SO glad we didn’t. There was not a single second in the 5 days between egg collection and our transfer that I even considered letting James near me for sex. Nuhuh, no way, thank you very much. It wasn’t that my vagina felt particularly sore from having a “dildo cam” shoved right up there with a huge needle attached, ready to batter through my uterus to collect the eggs. No, in fact, my vagina was the least of my worries. I felt no pain there whatsoever. I was so dam bloated and uncomfortable and exhausted that there was absolutely zero chance any kind of sexy-time was going to take place…. Sorry husband! In fact, in true Karen-sharing-too-much-information-style, I actually felt like this for about 6/7 weeks (I can’t remember exactly, it felt like forever) after egg collection and transfer… Perhaps that was just me – I had hyper-stimulated and to an extent “over-responded” to the meds which meant my ovaries were ENORMOUS, I was sore/uncomfortable and just dam tired. I think I was asleep by 9.30pm every night for a good few weeks (miracle for me) so basically, it wasn’t happening.

*turns out right sided ovary caused a lot more trouble – will get to that in a future blog!

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One thought on “EggCollection

  1. Pingback: I.V.F | myBlog

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